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3 Out High/Low Motion Offense Playbook

3 Out Motion – “Marquette Motion Offense”

Coach Lois Heeren, U of Wisconsin-La Crosse Women

Version of Bill Self’s Kansas 3 Out 2 In Motion Offense

What is a 3 out motion offense? Coach Erick Blasing breaks down a popular version of this offense made popular by Bill Self at Kansas. Coach Louis Heeren of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Women’s team has designed her own version of the offense. Included below are the diagrams for this 3 Out Offense if you want to download them.

Every coach will put their own twist and ownership on motion offense. Coach Lois Heeren of University of Wisconsin- La Crosse Women’s Basketball has titled her motion offense, Marquette. However, the offense is derived from the 3 out motion offense that Bill Self runs at Kansas.

Kansas was again back at the top of the Big XII this season and made another deep NCAA run. While the faces have changed and Coach Self has gained more recognition with the Jayhawks, one thing has not changed; the success of the Jayhawk 3 Out motion offense.  The ability to space the floor with a constant ball side triangle, good offensive rebounding positions, and great pin and skip opportunities continually makes Kansas the team to beat in the Big XII.

Coach Lois Heeren utilized this offense several seasons at UW-La Crosse and saw great team success. The 2015-16 campaign marked the 17th season and final season at the helm for Coach Heeren. In 2011, Coach Heeren led the Eagles to a 20-8 record and an at-large bid in the NCAA DIII tournament, the first appearance for the Eagles since the 1987-88 season. In 2011, Coach Heeren picked up her 200th career coaching victory and in 2015 she earned her 200th victory as coach of the Eagles. Heeren, who stepped down from her coaching duties following the 2015-2016 season finished as the winningest of 14th Head Coaches in the program’s history with 209 victories. UW-La Crosse had posted winning seasons in 6 of the past 10 years. Coach Heeren also sits at 9th in career victories throughout the history of the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.

From Greene, Iowa, Coach Heeren graduated from Truman State University and received her masters from the University of Iowa. Coach Heeren’s stops as an assistant coach include stops at NCAA DI Southwest Texas State, the United States Air Force Academy, and DIII UW-River Falls. Her Head Coaching resume includes NCAA DII Truman State University and DIII St. Mary’s University (Winona, MN).

The 3 Out Motion that Coach Heeren runs has been a staple for Coach Self and the Kansas Jayhawks. The Jayhawks reached the #1 ranking during the 2015-2016 season and earned a #1 seed in the NCAA tournament before falling to eventual National Champion Villanova in the Elite Eight.  Kansas is currently riding an 12 year regular season conference championship streak. The Jayhawks finished their season at 33-5 overall and 15-3 in conference. Coach Self following the 15-16 season holds a career record of 385-83 with the Jayhawks.

Hopefully this 3 out Motion offense will allow you to get some solid hi/low opportunities as well as great ball reversals. Good luck the rest of the way!

Download Below:

UW-L/Bill Self Kansas 3 Out Motion

3out2in-Hi-Lo-Offense

Raising Basketball IQ Part 1 – Habits

Basketball Habits by Coach Julia Allender

Habits can either make or break players and ultimately decide the outcome of a basketball game. Coach Julia Allender shares her thoughts on developing a basketball IQ.

[bctt tweet=”My intent is to raise the Basketball IQ of the player…then let them play the game.” username=”juliaallender”]

basketball coaching habits

Basketball IQ

There has been a phrase around sports training for a long time, maybe you have heard it? “Developing good habits” It has been used when coaches have been discussing training female basketball players and, in fact, it is used in the entire sporting world. Coaches have proclaimed that they want to “break their girls down, strip them of what they do wrong and then create and develop good habits”. You hear and see this at all levels and all ages. From Youth Leagues, AAU programs, High School, Junior College, Division I’s, II’s and III’s, the WNBA and NBA. It’s everywhere.

You have to ask yourself do you want to be (or even need to be) broken down? I don’t know about you but that sounds rather unappealing.

So what is a habit?

A habit is something that you do unconsciously or a way that you act in certain circumstances and situations. It is always something you do, at least partially unknowingly.

One example of a bad habit I have seen a lot of is a players traveling with the ball. There are as many different ways to do this as there are players. But what is interesting is how unaware they are of what their body is doing when they travel. This is a habit, they are doing it without deciding to do it and they are for the most part unaware that they are doing it.

With that understanding of what a habit is, then the real question is: Are there actually any “good” habits? Do you really want to unconsciously have to act a certain way because of some unknown and unseen force? Or would you rather be the one playing the game?

My view of this is, you don’t need habits. You need to understand the game of basketball well enough to respond and react to each situation as it occurs and you need to have practiced and learned well enough each of the fundamental basketball moves so that you can respond.

You need to understand basketball well enough so that as the action occurs and the defenses change you know instantly what you need to do and can do it.

When I coach a player I do not want to create habits, I want the player to have an increased awareness of what is happening around her on the court and to have the skill to respond to it, I want to train players to knowingly act! I want actions, which are based off of their knowledge I want them to use their judgment. There is another term for this it is called Basketball IQ.

My intent as a coach is to raise the Basketball IQ of the player and the physical skill then let them play the game.

Post Game Processing Sheet

Post Game Processing Sheet by Erick Blasing

Post game processing or the time period immediately following the game is an important window of opportunity for players to learn. Coach Erick Blasing shares a simple tool that he uses with his team to utilize this teaching time.

I mentioned in my last post that one of the best decisions I ever made as a coach in Sparta was to research “Train to Be Clutch” by Josh Metcalf and Jamie Gilbert. Their process is directing people to transformational leadership and increasing mental preparation for life. I am currently reading through their book, Burn Your Goals and it is fantastic. I highly recommend it. Please check out their site for more information on everything clutch as well as a lot of free resources:  http://t2bc.com/.

As a team we spent time pre-game as a team with no noise and used a simple visualization process to prepare for that night’s games.  While we used the pre-game routine every game we never rolled out the post game processing sheet. As I mentioned before, our pre-game went fantastic and made us a better team. The post-game form is very similar and something that I wish I would have utilized. I plan to implement this fully in the future.

I think a major piece that is often missing from teams is the ability to comprehend the ending of the game.

Often players will either internalize the responsibility for the game’s outcome or place blame on others around them to an extreme that is not proportional with reality.

Using the processing sheets, players can attempt to bring their emotions in check and understand what can be improved upon.

Game 2 of the Western Conference’s 2nd Round, San Antonio and Oklahoma City is a prime example of a game where post game processing could help the team improve. In a crazy ending that saw multiple missed calls against San Antonio, the Spurs still had a shot for the win in the end but did not prevail. While everyone is focusing on that high pressure ending with miscues and sloppy execution, processing sheets can help the players understand that in a 1 point loss, a turnover in the first half could have made the actual difference in the game. If you encounter a similar scenario, the processing sheet can help players look at the game with a clearer vision and understanding.

Coach Sherri Coale of the University of Oklahoma shared something very similar that they do every post game.

The post-game is a little more in-depth and would be very useful to have players complete immediately after the game or on the bus ride home.  These sheets would be a great help for the players during film study. I hope these help you and your team improve down the road!

Check out this link for your Post Game Processing Sheet

Enjoy the journey,

Erick